1. tooyoungforthelivingdead:

    FUCK.

    THIS.

     
  2. witchlingfumbles:

    ianosheabutter:

    image

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    Okay, here’s the thing. I don’t hate Sucker Punch because “it’s misogynist.” I hate it because it is rated PG-13. And knowing that it was rated PG-13, I was not prepared going in for the really heavy, really fucking triggering shit that is in this movie.

    They cut a consensual sex scene—but left in rampant violence against these girls, mental and emotional torture, and the fact that they were basically sex slaves. This. Movie. Should not. Have been rated. PG-13. PG-13 means you can take a middle schooler to see this. My mom teaches thirteen-year-olds. I do not want my mom’s students seeing this shit. This is violent, triggering shit that thirteen-year-olds are not prepared to deal with.

    Basically, as beautiful as the movie was, the MPAA fucked everything up the ass by rating it as appropriate for pubescent teenagers. And now excuse me, I’m about to cry.

    I wasn’t prepared for the really fucking triggering shit either. My unpreparedness for that shit wrecked my ability to enjoy the movie completely.

    The soundtrack was fucking amazing, the action scenes were brilliant, and I loved beyond ANYTHING that these five young ladies were Not Having That Shit and were going to teamwork the fuck out of there and I just loved so much about this movie… but then at the end, there was a moment when the terrible truth of the violence these girls went through hit me like a freight train and then sank in and everything felt awful forever.

    Just… I have a lot of feelings about this film and I haven’t seen it since it was in theaters and. Yeah.

    (Source: kirawalkers)

     
  3. Excuse me:

    raebird:

    I think we need to clear something up…

    • RAPE IS NEVER FUNNY.
    • NEVER.
    • EVER.
    • RAPE JOKES ARE NOT FUNNY.
    • YOU ARE NOT FUNNY IF YOU MAKE THEM.
    • AT ALL.
    • SO 
    • STOP.

    Thank you for allowing me to clear that up.

     
  4. image: Download

    witchlingfumbles:

sistersvenus:

thepeoplesrecord:

More football players charged with rape, another community blaming the victimMarch 20, 2013
Two football player high school students in Connecticut are charged with the second-degree sexual assault of a 13-year-old girl. The allegations come amid other complaints of hazing at the school, but Torrington High School officials insist that these are individual instances and not a part of a larger cultural problem. (Rape & violence are not a cultural problem? Really?)
But whether or not the alleged rapists Edgar Gonzalez and Joan Toribio, both 18, are maverick sexual assailants isn’t really the cultural question. Rather, the fact that students in the neighborhood and the school have taken to Twitter blame the young girl and not the alleged rapists highlights a broader rape culture that assumes men are only haphazardly involved in sexual assault, but it is usually the victim’s fault:

“If you look at crime statistics these things happen everywhere and we’re not any different than any other community,” said [Athletic Director Mike McKenna].
But on social media in recent weeks, dozens of athletes and Torrington High School students, male and female, have taunted the 13-year-old victim, calling her a “whore,” criticizing her for “snitching” and “ruining the lives” of the 18-year-old football players, and bullying students who defend her.

The Connecticut Register-Citizen highlights some of the offensive tweets about the girl:

“I wanna know why there’s no punishment for young hoes,” asked “@asmedick.” That comment was reposted three times.
Twelve days after the alleged incident, “@AyooWilliam” tweeted, “You destroyed two people’s life.” Another responded, “I hope you got what you wanted.”
“Sticking up for a girl who wanted the D and then snitched? have a seat pleaseeee,” wrote “@ShelbyyKalinski.”

As the case in Steubenville proved, social media has brought a whole new slew of evidence to sexual assault allegations, particularly among young people. Unfortunately, the lesson some news outlets take from this is that Steubenville was “a cautionary tale for teenagers living in today’s digital world.” In reality, social media helps to underline a very real problem: A victim-blaming rape culture that is inclined to take the side of the assailant instead of the victim.
Source

are you KIDDING MEEE

13 fucking years old. And THEY’RE the victims.
Fuck everything.

    witchlingfumbles:

    sistersvenus:

    thepeoplesrecord:

    More football players charged with rape, another community blaming the victim
    March 20, 2013

    Two football player high school students in Connecticut are charged with the second-degree sexual assault of a 13-year-old girl. The allegations come amid other complaints of hazing at the school, but Torrington High School officials insist that these are individual instances and not a part of a larger cultural problem. (Rape & violence are not a cultural problem? Really?)

    But whether or not the alleged rapists Edgar Gonzalez and Joan Toribio, both 18, are maverick sexual assailants isn’t really the cultural question. Rather, the fact that students in the neighborhood and the school have taken to Twitter blame the young girl and not the alleged rapists highlights a broader rape culture that assumes men are only haphazardly involved in sexual assault, but it is usually the victim’s fault:

    “If you look at crime statistics these things happen everywhere and we’re not any different than any other community,” said [Athletic Director Mike McKenna].

    But on social media in recent weeks, dozens of athletes and Torrington High School students, male and female, have taunted the 13-year-old victim, calling her a “whore,” criticizing her for “snitching” and “ruining the lives” of the 18-year-old football players, and bullying students who defend her.

    The Connecticut Register-Citizen highlights some of the offensive tweets about the girl:

    I wanna know why there’s no punishment for young hoes,” asked “@asmedick.” That comment was reposted three times.

    Twelve days after the alleged incident, “@AyooWilliam” tweeted, “You destroyed two people’s life.” Another responded, “I hope you got what you wanted.”

    “Sticking up for a girl who wanted the D and then snitched? have a seat pleaseeee,” wrote “@ShelbyyKalinski.”

    As the case in Steubenville proved, social media has brought a whole new slew of evidence to sexual assault allegations, particularly among young people. Unfortunately, the lesson some news outlets take from this is that Steubenville was “a cautionary tale for teenagers living in today’s digital world.” In reality, social media helps to underline a very real problem: A victim-blaming rape culture that is inclined to take the side of the assailant instead of the victim.

    Source

    are you KIDDING MEEE

    13 fucking years old. And THEY’RE the victims.

    Fuck everything.

    (Source: thepeoplesrecord)

     
  5. drowsyfantasy:

    If you rape someone, it doesn’t matter that you’re only 16.

    If you rape someone, it doesn’t matter that you cry like a child in court.

    If you rape someone, it doesn’t matter that you had a promising future.

    if you rape someone, it doesn’t matter that your life is destroyed.

    If you rape someone, it should haunt you for the rest of your life. 

    You raped someone. 

    You deserve every ounce of justice we can place upon you in court of law. 

     
  6. 11:01

    Notes: 16201

    Reblogged from eraofstories

    Tags: trigger warning

    Reblog if a man has ever tried—no matter how ‘sweetly’—to make you change your mind when you said “no”

    hazellazer:

    Curious how often this happens.

     
  7. For readers interested in learning more about how not to be labeled as registered sex offenders, a good first step is not to rape unconscious women, no matter how good your grades are. Regardless of the strength of your GPA (weighted or unweighted), if you commit rape, there is a possibility you may someday be convicted of a sex crime. This is because of your decision to commit a sex crime instead of going for a walk, or reading a book by Cormac McCarthy. Your ability to perform calculus or play football is generally not taken into consideration in a court of law. Should you prefer to be known as ‘Good student and excellent football player Trent Mays’ rather than ‘Convicted sex offender Trent Mays,’ try stressing the studying and tackling and giving the sex crimes a miss altogether…

    Trent Mays and Ma’lik Richardson are not the “stars” of the Steubenville rape trial. They aren’t the only characters in a drama playing out in eastern Ohio. And yet a CNN viewer learning about the Steubenville rape verdict is presented with dynamic, sympathetic, complicated male figures, and a nonentity of an anonymous victim, the ‘lasting effects’ of whose graphic, public sexual assault are ignored. Small wonder, then, that anyone would find themselves on the side of these men—these poor young men, who were very good at taking tests and playing sports when they were not raping their classmates.
    — 

    Mallory Ortberg of Gawker, critiquing CNN’s disgusting response to the Stuebenville rape trial verdicts. 

    Her commentary is spot on.

    (via cognitivedissonance)

     
  8. mamis:

    Im really angry about how people react to rape cases. Specifically when young men rape and then get convicted. Everyone goes look at the poor boys!! Look at how bright their futures were!! This one even cried and said sorry!! Wow how sad that they have to spend a year in jail!!

    Its like the person that was raped doesnt matter. How they have to live every day knowing that someone took advantage of such a sacred space as ones own body. An apology and some fucking tears wont take that pain away ever.

    Disclaimer i know that men can be raped and that women can rape etc etc. im referencing the stubinville(sp) rape case specifically.

     
  9. globalcooldown:

    goblinparty:

    My mom said if this post gets 500,000 notes nothing will happen.

    But if this petition gets 500,000 signatures we can get federal laws preventing rapists from suing for custody/visitation of their victim’s children.

    You guys accomplished Operation Fluffy Chicken
    How about putting in an effort to Operation We’re Finally Taking Rape Seriously?

    500,000 signatures?

    image

    LET’S SIGNAL BOOST THIS SHIT.

     
  10. I wanna see something. Reblog if you think emotional and mental abuse are just as bad as physical abuse.

    herbalialavandula:

    Abuse IS ABUSE. Period.

    (Source: fullmetalchickenwuss)