1. 15:50 27th Jan 2012

    Notes: 11

    Reblogged from obsessivepuzzles

    Tags: acta

    obsessivepuzzles:

    waffleguppies:

    rosy-divide-by-zero:

    Hey

    Je vais faire une parenthèse, ACTA n’est pas encore passé. L’espoir fait vivre, les fanfictions ne seront peut-être pas, dans le futur, une raison de se faire condamner.

    Je me suis mise en tête récemment de… Enfin, vous voyez, j’ai eu un coup de tête, et j’ai dis “Je vais traduire Blue…

    Signal boost for a scary-awesome idea?

    Wish I hadn’t failed French, but for all you French majors out there!

    (Source: rosy-under-your-bed)

     
  2. ademska:

    “As we noted in our post about people just discovering ACTA this week, some had put together an odd White House petition, asking the White House to “end ACTA.” The oddity was over the fact that the President just signed ACTA a few months ago. What struck us as a more interesting question was the serious constitutional questions of whether or not Obama is even allowed to sign ACTA.

    In case you haven’t been following this or don’t spend your life dealing in Constitutional minutiae, the debate is over the nature of the agreement. A treaty between the US and other nations requires Senate approval. However, there’s a “simpler” form of an international agreement, known as an “executive agreement,” which allows the President to sign the agreement without getting approval. In theory, this also limits the ability of the agreement to bind Congress. In practice… however, international agreements are international agreements. Some legal scholars have suggested that the only real difference between a treaty and an executive agreement is the fact that… the president calls any treaty an “executive agreement” if he’s unsure if the Senate would approve it. Another words, the difference is basically in how the President presents it.

    That said, even if Obama has declared ACTA an executive agreement (while those in Europe insist that it’s a binding treaty), there is a very real Constitutional question here: can it actually be an executive agreement? The law is clear that the only things that can be covered by executive agreements are things that involve items that are solely under the President’s mandate. That is, you can’t sign an executive agreement that impacts the things Congress has control over. But here’s the thing: intellectual property, in Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution, is an issue given to Congress, not the President. Thus, there’s a pretty strong argument that the president legally cannot sign any intellectual property agreements as an executive agreement and, instead, must submit them to the Senate.

    It looks like folks have figured this out, and there’s now a new White House petition, demanding that ACTA be brought to the Senate before it can be ratified/signed by the US. This petition should be a lot more interesting than the other one if it gets enough signatures (so encourage people to sign, please!).”

    (via techdirt.com)

    Reblog this, because it’s MUCH more important and potentially effective than petitions asking President Obama to reverse his position.

    Right now, Republicans are more anti-SOPA/PIPA (and by extension ACTA) than Democrats. If we question Obama’s authority to override Congress, they’re going to latch on and help us get this out of his hands, and at the very least they’ll bring it to public attention.

    Believe it or not, Republicans are our biggest ally in the internet war right now, and this is the kind of politics fight they love most.

    Actually last ACTA post for tonight.

     
  3. itsallfine:

    I like how every single post about MegaVideo/MegaUpload is solely about how horrible everything is without being able to watch movies online and there’s not a single mention about the fact that the people who owned and ran it have just lost their jobs and are going to prison.

     
  4. fuckyeahmusicalscores:

shaddicted:

ceilingtheo:

Most of the anti-ACTA petitions I’ve seen so far I’ve been a little dubious of, but I’ve just found out Access Now are running one. Access Now campaign on internet freedom issues all over the world, and they’re one of the three main organisations where I do most of my slacktivism, so I’m pleased to know they’re doing something about ACTA. If you care about internet freedom and you aren’t already familiar with Access Now, you should definitely consider following their work.
Anyway: ANTI-ACTA PETITION. GO SIGN.

This is even worse than SOPA. Also it’s in Europe. PLEASE SIGN AND SPREAD THE WORD. SOPA is dead. We can do this with ACTA too.
More info: http://gamzeemakara.tumblr.com/post/16168274010/more-people-need-to-know-about-acta-so-here-we

Not a strictly relevant post, but everyone on the internet needs to know what ACTA is. It’s like SOPA, but worse and practically global because 39 countries, including the United States, may sign the treaty, even though it’s just the European Parliament voting on it at the moment.
And it could land all our mods in prison.
Take action here!

    fuckyeahmusicalscores:

    shaddicted:

    ceilingtheo:

    Most of the anti-ACTA petitions I’ve seen so far I’ve been a little dubious of, but I’ve just found out Access Now are running one. Access Now campaign on internet freedom issues all over the world, and they’re one of the three main organisations where I do most of my slacktivism, so I’m pleased to know they’re doing something about ACTA. If you care about internet freedom and you aren’t already familiar with Access Now, you should definitely consider following their work.

    Anyway: ANTI-ACTA PETITION. GO SIGN.

    This is even worse than SOPA. Also it’s in Europe. PLEASE SIGN AND SPREAD THE WORD. SOPA is dead. We can do this with ACTA too.

    More info: http://gamzeemakara.tumblr.com/post/16168274010/more-people-need-to-know-about-acta-so-here-we

    Not a strictly relevant post, but everyone on the internet needs to know what ACTA is. It’s like SOPA, but worse and practically global because 39 countries, including the United States, may sign the treaty, even though it’s just the European Parliament voting on it at the moment.

    And it could land all our mods in prison.

    Take action here!

    (Source: injokeregrets)

     
  5. 14:33

    Notes: 12615

    Reblogged from usbdongle

    Tags: end of internet 2012acta

    waffleguppies:

    PLEASE REBLOG THIS LIKE THE PLAGUE

    warbucks:

    faux-tail:

    prawnosaurus:

    This is a petition on the Directgov website - this goes straight through to parliment and at the current time of posting it only has 21 signatures

    I know a lot of people are reblogging the one sponsored by anonymous which is great but if you live in the UK, this is going to be your best best at getting yourself heard about ACTA - even if you don’t live in the UK or even the EU, PLEASE REBLOG THIS, as ACTA is something that not only affects Europe but the rest of the world as well and this could be one of the only opportunities for it to be downturned

    America isn’t the only ones having problems, guys. The same way SOPA and PIPA threatened the future of all countries through example, ACTA is working on settling in as one of the many bricks in the wall.

    Reblog, sign, do what you can.

    just an fyi, your signature doesn’t get added to the petition until you click the link in your email inbox. 

    This took me twenty seconds, including confirming via the email they send. Do it! Super important!

    (Source: snapsaplenty)

     
  6. 16:04 20th Jan 2012

    Notes: 2

    Tags: acta

     
  7. Sorry for all the Anit-Censorship blogging lately…

    madamace:

    Actually… no. I’m not sorry. This is important. And it goes much deeper than just not being about to watch your pirated movies and no more funny gifs of copyrighted characters. We’re talking about free speech, our most fundamental right as American citizens… and if we take ACTA into the equation, a right that everyone in the world deserves.

    “Censorship is always about maintaining the status quo and keeping people ignorant.” -Nick Farrell

    Censorship is a bad thing. We can all pretty much agree. And as far as my opinion goes, SOPA/PIPA is a tyrannical proposal to punish innocent people just because big production companies didn’t sell enough of their shitty products. They have enough power as it is to take down videos on Youtube and combat music sharing websites like Napster without SOPA. They don’t need the ability to throw people in jail for 5 years for it too.

    Passing SOPA would lead to more restrictions on our rights to free speech and privacy as well. Suppression of important, vital information to the uninformed masses about corrupt politics and politicians could be in the near future if SOPA passes.

    I’ve been following this whole SOPA deal for months now and I’m really grateful for the hype. When I started to write my research paper about Internet censorship, many people had no idea what I was talking about. And as my words fell on deaf ears… I’ve realized that this is not something I can do alone.

    If there’s anything that my history teacher taught me that was useful… it’s this: Money talks. You as a consumer can support or refuse to support the companies that favor the bill. Boycott their products. Buy from independent publishers. Pirate shit if you can. (Pirating is not bad. People will buy your stuff if they like it. Even Notch, the creator of Minecraft told someone on his Twitter to pirate the game, buy it if they like it, and reminds them to feel bad about later. http://gaminglulz.tumblr.com/post/15782628209/notch-telling-someone-to-pirate-minecraft-and-pay )

    Don’t forget to talk to your representatives. Let them know your opinion. Together, we can stop SOPA/PIPA and ACTA, and protect our rights.

     
  8. likesirensinthenight:

    This is a great explanation of ACTA/SOPA.

    Watch it if you’re still not sure how terrible this idea is.

     
  9. czarofdeath:

    Post by gamzeemakara

    Please help. We won’t be able to send you BBC and European TV and stuff if this passes. As my friend said, this is dangerous and scary.

     
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