1. image: Download

    laughingsquid:

A Surprise Life Size LEGO Forest Pops Up in the Australian Outback
     
  2. 12:12 10th Jul 2012

    Notes: 2380

    Reblogged from neurotoxinsonline

    Tags: australiasafety

    clambistro:

    everythingbutharleyquinn:

    ialreadysaidno:

    FOR AUSTRALIAN RESIDENTS.


    Give the above number (0450 352 004) out to men or anyone who doggedly persists in trying to get your number even after you’ve already said no. 

    SAVE THIS NUMBER IN YOUR PHONE FOR EASY RECALL!

    We have all had the experience of enjoying ourselves whilst out, minding our own business, when a strange man will bail us up with unscolicited attention in the effort to convince us to go out with him. These men will not take no for an answer, but will hound us with “kindness”, attempting to wear us down through the sheer force of their persistence even though we communicate a lack of interest. Such men will often become resentful and indignant when spurred because they believe themselves to be “nice guys” just trying to show us appreciation, despite the fact they cannot respect our boundaries and our wishes. They behave as though they are entitled to our attention and we owe them our time just because they decided they thought we were beautiful.

    Often times, this degree of unwanted attention becomes a type of passive bullying, leaving us feeling unsafe, insecure and uncomfortable without any sure ways of getting out of the situation because the man in question is trying to set it up so the only exit is giving in. Women are groomed to be nice and pleasant always in social interactions and because these guys don’t use any obvious nastiness it leaves us more conflicted about being assertive.

    DON’T PUT UP WITH IT ANY LONGER!

    GIVE THESE DISRESPECTFUL MEN THIS NUMBER:

    0450 352 004

    WHEN THEY CALL IT, THEY WILL HEAR THE FOLLOWING MESSAGE:

    Hello. If you have been given this number, it means that you have made someone feel uncomfortable, unsafe, perhaps even threatened. Most likely you have pestered a woman for her phone number, even after she said no. Maybe even said no repeatedly. You put so much pressure on this woman she had no choice but to give you this number in order to get you to leave her alone. If you want to have more success with women in the future, learn to respect our boundaries and our autonomy and accept that we don’t owe you attention. No means no, even when you’re not about to stick your dick in someone. If you would like to learn how to be more respectful towards women, please visit ialreadysaidno.tumblr.com

    SAVE THIS NUMBER IN YOUR PHONE FOR EASY RECALL! 


    PLEASE REBLOG THIS AND SPREAD THIS AROUND!

    After hearing one too many stories from friends and experiencing one too many similar incidents ourselves, it was time to take action and provide a number that any person within Australia can save into their phone to give out to men who hound them for their number when they are clearly not interested. 

    Please reblog this far and wide and please do make use of the number yourselves!!! It is for all people, Australia-wide, who ever find themselves subject to this particularly passive-aggressive behaviour!

    This is brilliant.

    (Source: )

     
  3. geologise:

World-first discovery of hybrid sharks off Australia’s east coast.→ Article from University of Queensland.
A group of leading marine scientists has discovered that sharks on Australia’s east coast display a mysterious tendency to interbreed, challenging several accepted scientific theories regarding shark behaviour.
In a joint-UQ research project, scientists have discovered widespread hybridisation in the wild between two shark species commonly caught in Australia’s east coast shark fisheries.
The Australian black tip shark (Carcharhinus tilstoni) and the common black tip shark (C. limbatus) have overlapping distributions along the northern and eastern Australian coastline.
Using both genetic testing and body measurements, 57 hybrid animals were identified from five locations, spanning 2000km from northern NSW to far northern Queensland. Although closely related, the two species grow to different maximum sizes and are genetically distinct.
Dr Jennifer Ovenden, an expert in genetics of fisheries species and a member of the scientific team said this was the first discovery of sharks hybridising and it flagged a warning that other closely related shark and ray species around the world may be doing the same thing.
“Wild hybrids are usually hard to find, so detecting hybrids and their offspring is extraordinary,” Dr Ovenden said.
“To find 57 hybrids along 2000km of coastline is unprecedented.”
“Hybridisation could enable the sharks to adapt to environmental change as the smaller Australian black tip currently favours tropical waters in the north.
“While the larger common black tip is more abundant in sub-tropical and temperate waters along the south-eastern Australian coastline.”
Scientists from The University of Queensland, James Cook University’s Fishing and Fisheries Research Centre, the Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation and the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries are now investigating the full extent of the hybrid zone and are attempting to measure hybrid fitness.
The research, co-funded by the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, identified a mismatch between species identification using mitochondrial DNA sequence and species identification using morphological characters (length at sexual maturity, length at birth and number of vertebrae).
A nuclear DNA marker (inherited from both parents) was sequenced to confirm the hybrid status.
Dr Colin Simpfendorfer from James Cook University’s Fishing and Fisheries Research Centre said black tip sharks were one of the most studied species in tropical Australia.
“The results of this research show that we still have a lot to learn about these important ocean predators,” he said.

    geologise:

    World-first discovery of hybrid sharks off Australia’s east coast.
    → Article from University of Queensland.

    A group of leading marine scientists has discovered that sharks on Australia’s east coast display a mysterious tendency to interbreed, challenging several accepted scientific theories regarding shark behaviour.

    In a joint-UQ research project, scientists have discovered widespread hybridisation in the wild between two shark species commonly caught in Australia’s east coast shark fisheries.

    The Australian black tip shark (Carcharhinus tilstoni) and the common black tip shark (C. limbatus) have overlapping distributions along the northern and eastern Australian coastline.

    Using both genetic testing and body measurements, 57 hybrid animals were identified from five locations, spanning 2000km from northern NSW to far northern Queensland. Although closely related, the two species grow to different maximum sizes and are genetically distinct.

    Dr Jennifer Ovenden, an expert in genetics of fisheries species and a member of the scientific team said this was the first discovery of sharks hybridising and it flagged a warning that other closely related shark and ray species around the world may be doing the same thing.

    “Wild hybrids are usually hard to find, so detecting hybrids and their offspring is extraordinary,” Dr Ovenden said.

    “To find 57 hybrids along 2000km of coastline is unprecedented.”

    “Hybridisation could enable the sharks to adapt to environmental change as the smaller Australian black tip currently favours tropical waters in the north.

    “While the larger common black tip is more abundant in sub-tropical and temperate waters along the south-eastern Australian coastline.”

    Scientists from The University of Queensland, James Cook University’s Fishing and Fisheries Research Centre, the Queensland Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation and the New South Wales Department of Primary Industries are now investigating the full extent of the hybrid zone and are attempting to measure hybrid fitness.

    The research, co-funded by the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, identified a mismatch between species identification using mitochondrial DNA sequence and species identification using morphological characters (length at sexual maturity, length at birth and number of vertebrae).

    A nuclear DNA marker (inherited from both parents) was sequenced to confirm the hybrid status.

    Dr Colin Simpfendorfer from James Cook University’s Fishing and Fisheries Research Centre said black tip sharks were one of the most studied species in tropical Australia.

    “The results of this research show that we still have a lot to learn about these important ocean predators,” he said.